Phosphate Institute – IMPHOS http://imphos.org/ Fri, 24 Sep 2021 14:28:45 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://imphos.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/IMPHOS-icon-150x150.jpg Phosphate Institute – IMPHOS http://imphos.org/ 32 32 Can Saied’s plan solve Tunisia’s problems? https://imphos.org/can-saieds-plan-solve-tunisias-problems/ https://imphos.org/can-saieds-plan-solve-tunisias-problems/#respond Fri, 24 Sep 2021 14:28:45 +0000 https://imphos.org/can-saieds-plan-solve-tunisias-problems/ As the country is mired in a series of structural problems, President Kais Saied’s decision to cement one-man rule will only increase irresponsibility and corruption. Two months after President Kais Saied’s July 25 decisions, Tunisians still have no prime minister and no parliament. Saied’s intervention came amid frustrations over the proliferation of deaths linked to […]]]>

As the country is mired in a series of structural problems, President Kais Saied’s decision to cement one-man rule will only increase irresponsibility and corruption.

Two months after President Kais Saied’s July 25 decisions, Tunisians still have no prime minister and no parliament.

Saied’s intervention came amid frustrations over the proliferation of deaths linked to the pandemic, corruption and economic challenges. Saied, who continues to receive a wide range of support among Tunisians, said he wanted to strengthen the role of the presidency and change electoral laws.

As he has consolidated power In his hands by presidential decree on September 22, the question remains whether the shift to a presidential system with concentrated powers can help combat Tunisia’s economic problems while consolidating its democracy.

We contend that Saied’s approach will face substantial limitations as some of Tunisia’s problems have structural roots and regime change does not necessarily provide solutions to them.

Moreover, given Tunisia’s institutional heritage, the consolidation of power risks increasing irresponsibility and corruption. If the president is to move the country forward, he will need to engage with a variety of actors instead of restricting decision-making to the Palace of Carthage.

Although Tunisia has been successful in advancing individual freedoms since the 2011 revolution, it has made little progress in addressing endemic corruption or economic problems, which have worsened further due to the Covid-19 pandemic.

Since July 25, Saied has succeeded in reducing pandemic-related deaths, in part thanks to donations provided by other countries, and it has taken economic measures, such as launching cooperation with the Union of retail stores to reduce the price of certain products.

However, this initiative was not sufficient to curb inflation, especially in food prices. Likewise, a daring justice system attacks politicians suspected of corruption, including MPs suspected of smuggling, money laundering and tax evasion, and abuse of state plans.

Likewise, Saied replaced some governors and other senior state officials, a task traditionally undertaken by the cabinet. These steps show the extent of the consolidation of power in Saied’s hands to overcome endemic corruption.

Consolidation of power, in its essence, comes with two main promises: stability and a greater ability to solve structural problems. It can broaden the toolbox for a more focused approach to key issues and enhance investor confidence.

However, it does not necessarily provide a panacea for all problems and can sometimes have negative repercussions as institutions do not operate on a white table.

As a country with late industrialization, trade deficits and large public debts limit the capacity for domestic spending and distribution of welfare in Tunisia. This situation is exacerbated by the high barriers to entering the market for domestic entrepreneurs, the prevalence of veto players, rampant corruption and unwavering inflation, which is partly imported by the exchange rate.

Moreover, due to decades of authoritarian rule, Tunisia has a top-down, distributive and mostly irresponsible institutional heritage, influencing the functioning of many institutions, such as the bureaucracy, the private sector, unions and even the security forces. . So far, Saied has not set any clear plan to tackle these structural issues.

The lack of a clear strategy is also likely to limit the anti-corruption initiative to some high-profile cases and run out of steam over time, with the Anti-Corruption Institute (INLUCC) closed after July 25. .

Moreover, the consolidation of power in a single head may paradoxically embolden some corrupt practices in the future.

In a hyper-centralized system, large companies can more easily enter into agreements with central authorities without needing to convince intermediary sources of power. It is also linked to a central paradox in Saied’s model of hybrid democracy, which assumes that the “general will” represented by the president overlaps with the interests of individuals.

A clear example of this paradox came when Saied’s call to increase phosphate production contradicted decades of activism by environmental groups. Likewise, when Saied tried to reduce market prices, he requested the support of the Union of Retail Stores, a quasi-monopolistic organization, illustrating the limits of his approach.

Due to the ambiguity of the plans, some organizations, such as the Tunisian General Labor Union (UGTT), which initially supported the president’s decisions, are now asking him to declare a clear roadmap and schedule legislative elections. Although the Constitution clearly stipulates the conditions for ratifying laws, Saied can still choose to submit reforms to a referendum without seeking ratification by parliament.

It is still unclear whether Saied would be interested in choosing the plan he envisioned or whether he would settle for a “compromise” that maintains a role for political parties and parliament. Moreover, as polls indicate, there is no guarantee that a majority will support the presidential system.

Moving forward, we see it as a better strategy that Saied engages with all actors, including parliament, to launch a sustainable agenda. “Consensus” in Tunisia sometimes meant avoiding hard-to-solve problems and normalizing corruption.

We agree that ending corruption and building judicial capacity are prerequisites for a viable compromise. These objectives can be achieved by creating a Constitutional Court, strengthening the judiciary and setting new conditions for parliamentary immunities without fully consolidating power in the hands of the president.

The current institutional structure is unlikely to allow one person to solve the socio-economic problems of the country.

Instead, it is time to recognize that the diversity and competition between different interests in Tunisia, coupled with its institutional heritage, requires an approach based on humility and compromise that would involve the president, parliament, parties. politicians, professional organizations, unions and other civil society groups.

Disclaimer: The views expressed by the authors do not necessarily reflect the opinions, views and editorial policies of TRT World.

We welcome all pitches and submissions to TRT World Opinion – please email them to opinion.editorial@trtworld.com

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UT Southwest Biochemist and Molecular Biologist named Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigators: Newsroom https://imphos.org/ut-southwest-biochemist-and-molecular-biologist-named-howard-hughes-medical-institute-investigators-newsroom/ https://imphos.org/ut-southwest-biochemist-and-molecular-biologist-named-howard-hughes-medical-institute-investigators-newsroom/#respond Thu, 23 Sep 2021 13:15:31 +0000 https://imphos.org/ut-southwest-biochemist-and-molecular-biologist-named-howard-hughes-medical-institute-investigators-newsroom/ DALLAS – September 23, 2021 – Two UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers – a biochemist and a molecular biologist – are among 33 prominent scientists across the country appointed as Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) researchers. Vincent Tagliabracci, Ph.D., associate professor of molecular biology, and Benjamin Tu, Ph.D., professor of biochemistry, both members of the […]]]>




DALLAS – September 23, 2021 – Two UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers – a biochemist and a molecular biologist – are among 33 prominent scientists across the country appointed as Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) researchers.

Vincent Tagliabracci, Ph.D., associate professor of molecular biology, and Benjamin Tu, Ph.D., professor of biochemistry, both members of the Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center at UT Southwestern, were the only Texas scientists named this year, bringing the number of HHMI investigators at UT Southwestern to 14. UT Southwestern has the largest number of HHMI investigators in Texas, home to more than three-quarters of Texas’ 18 HHMI investigators.

“We are delighted that Drs. Tagliabracci and Tu were selected for this great honor on the basis of both their past work and in particular their promise of important discoveries in the future, ”said Daniel K. Podolsky, MD, President of UT Southwestern.

“Dr. Tagliabracci has discovered an unexpected new family of pseudokinases that alter protein form and function in a manner categorically distinct from canonical kinases. His work sheds new light on a wide range of physiological processes that rely on these enzymes.” said Dr. Podolsky, Distinguished Presidential Philip O’Bryan Montgomery, Jr., MD in Academic Administration and the Doris and Bryan Wildenthal Distinguished Chair in Medical Sciences. Tu’s work linking cell metabolism to critical cell functions leads to a better understanding of a variety of diseases, including cancer.

Each researcher will receive approximately $ 9 million over seven years, renewable pending scientific review by HHMI, a philanthropic organization established to advance basic biomedical research and scientific education for the benefit of humanity. .

Dr Benjamin Tu

Photo by Benjamin Tu, Ph.D.

Benjamin Tu, Ph.D.

Dr. Tu’s lab studies how fundamental cellular processes such as cell growth and division, transcription, translation, mitochondrial homeostasis, and autophagy are coordinated with the metabolic state of the cell. For many of their studies, Dr Tu and his colleagues use budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model organization to discover the fundamentals of regulation; they also extended some of their findings to mammalian systems.

“I am grateful to my past and present interns for their dedication and perseverance in the process of scientific discovery. Seeing their enthusiasm when posting the HHMI announcement was one of the nicest feelings, ”said Dr Tu. “I would also like to thank my mentors – Steve McKnight, Jonathan Weissman and Jim Wang – as well as my colleagues in the Department of Biochemistry and UTSW for their support and company over the years. We have tended to do science in a certain way. That our approach and our work are recognized by the HHMI is reassuring and truly an honor. And now, to have the freedom and resources to venture into new directions of research, it is exhilarating to think about the possibilities.

Dr. Tu’s research has shown that metabolites play an underestimated role in regulating cell growth and homeostasis. For example, in a 2011 study published in Molecular cell, Dr Tu and his colleagues have defined a key role for the acetyl-CoA metabolite in the activation of genes necessary for cell growth. This new understanding of the importance of acetyl-CoA led to a 2014 Cell document, in which the team reported how the metabolite could also be important for the survival and growth of liver cancer cells. Dr. Tu’s current research in mice is aimed at determining whether chemicals that inhibit the synthesis of acetyl-CoA can slow the growth of pancreatic cancer.

Dr Tu came to UT Southwestern in 2004 after earning a Masters and BS in Chemistry from Harvard University and a PhD. in Biochemistry and Biophysics from the University of California at San Francisco. He worked as a postdoctoral fellow with Steven McKnight, Ph.D., professor and former chair of biochemistry, before joining the faculty of UTSW in 2007. His previous honors include selection as a finalist for the National Blavatnik Award for young scientists. UT Southwestern Presidential Fellow, Dr Tu holds the Martha Steiner Chair in Medical Research and the WW Caruth, Jr. Scholar in Biomedical Research.

Dr Vincent Tagliabracci

Photo by Vincent Tagliabracci, Ph.D.

Vincent Tagliabracci, Ph.D.

Dr. Tagliabracci’s lab is studying how extracellular proteins are modified by phosphorylation – the addition of a phosphate group that can alter protein activity – by a new family of enzymes called pseudokinases that are secreted by cells. This branch of the kinase family is so different from canonical kinases that it was not originally included in the human kinome tree.

Pseudokinases have long been considered non-functional; however, the work of Dr. Tagliabracci has shown that these enzymes perform completely different types of chemical reactions from those of classical kinases. These reactions include a process called AMPylation, in which certain pseudokinases transfer adenosine monophosphate, one of the nucleotides that make up DNA, to proteins; and glutamylation, in which pseudokinases transfer the amino acid glutamate to proteins.

“I am honored to join the ranks of HHMI researchers and grateful to my lab members, collaborators, departmental colleagues and Chairman Eric Olson for helping to push this research in new directions,” said Dr. Tagliabracci, who is a Michael L. Rosenberg Fellow in Medical Research. “This support will allow us to continue to unravel the mysteries of pseudokinases and their relevance to human health. “

Pseudokinases appear to play a key role in a wide range of physiological processes important to human health, including lipid metabolism, wound healing, cell migration, biomineralization, inflammation and nervous system development, said Dr. Tagliabracci.

He received his bachelor’s degree in chemistry and biology from the University of Indianapolis and his doctorate. in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology from Indiana University. In 2010, he joined Dr. Jack Dixon’s lab as a postdoctoral fellow at the University of California, San Diego, where he identified the Fam20C pseudokinase as the sought-after kinase that phosphorylates a milk protein. In 2015, he joined the faculty of UT Southwestern as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Molecular Biology.

Dr Tagliabracci is the recipient of the National Institutes of Health Pathway to Independence Award, the Welch Foundation Norman Hackerman Award in Chemical Research (2020), the NIH Director’s New Innovator Award (2019-2024) and a cancer prevention program. and Research Institute of Texas (CPRIT) recruiting first tenure-track faculty member.

Other researchers at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute at UT Southwestern are:

  • Zhijian “James” Chen, Ph.D., professor of molecular biology and the Center for Host Defense Genetics, George L. MacGregor Chair in Biomedical Sciences.
  • Ralph DeBerardinis, MD, Ph.D., professor of pediatrics and at the Eugene McDermott Center for Human Growth and Development, director of the Genetic and Metabolic Diseases program at the Children’s Medical Center Research Institute at UT Southwestern, which holds the Joel B. Steinberg, MD Distinguished Chair in Pediatrics and is a Sowell Family Scholar in medical research.
  • Helen Hobbs, MD, professor and director of the Eugene McDermott Center for Human Growth and Development and professor of internal medicine and molecular genetics, holder of the Eugene McDermott Emeritus Chair for the Study of Human Growth and Development, the Philip O ‘ Bryan Montgomery Jr., MD, Distinguished Chair in Developmental Biology, and the [1995] Dallas Heart Ball Chair in Cardiology Research.
  • Lora Hooper, Ph.D., Professor of Immunology, Microbiology, and the Center for Host Defense Genetics, Jonathan W. Uhr Chair, MD Distinguished Chair in Immunology, and Nancy Cain and Jeffrey A Fellow Marcus in Medical Research, in honor of Dr. Bill S. Vowell.
  • Youxing Jiang, Ph.D., Professor of Physiology and Biophysics, Rosewood Corporation Chair in Biomedical Sciences and WW Caruth, Jr. Fellow in Biomedical Research.
  • David Mangelsdorf, Ph.D., professor and holder of the chair of pharmacology and biochemistry, holder of the Alfred G. Gilman chair in pharmacology and the Raymond and Ellen Willie chair in molecular neuropharmacology in honor of Harold B. Crasilneck , Ph.D.
  • Joshua Mendell, MD, Ph.D., professor of molecular biology.
  • Sean Morrison, Ph.D., director of the Children’s Medical Center Research Institute at UT Southwestern and professor of pediatrics, Mary McDermott Cook Chair in Pediatric Genetics.
  • Kim Orth, Ph.D., professor of molecular biology and biochemistry, who is WW Caruth, Jr. Scholar in Biomedical Research and Earl A. Forsythe Chair in Biomedical Sciences.
  • Duojia Pan, Ph.D., professor and holder of the Fouad A. and Val Imm Bashour chair of physiology in physiology.
  • Michael K. Rosen, Ph.D., Professor and Chair of Biophysics and Cecil H. and Ida Green Comprehensive Center for Molecular, Computational and Systems Biology, Mar Nell and F. Andrew Bell Chair in Biochemistry.
  • Dr Joseph Takahashi, Professor and Loyd B. Sands Chair in Neuroscience.

Dr McKnight holds the Distinguished Chair in Basic Biomedical Research.

About UT Southwestern Medical Center

UT Southwestern, one of the nation’s leading academic medical centers, integrates pioneering biomedical research with exceptional clinical care and education. The institution’s faculty has been awarded six Nobel Prizes and includes 25 members of the National Academy of Sciences, 16 members of the National Academy of Medicine and 14 researchers of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. The full-time faculty of over 2,800 is responsible for groundbreaking medical advancements and is committed to rapidly translating science-driven research into new clinical treatments. Doctors at UT Southwestern provide care in approximately 80 specialties to more than 117,000 inpatients, more than 360,000 emergency room cases and supervise nearly 3 million outpatient visits per year.



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Northwestern-invented biomaterials technology moves from lab bench to orthopedic market https://imphos.org/northwestern-invented-biomaterials-technology-moves-from-lab-bench-to-orthopedic-market/ https://imphos.org/northwestern-invented-biomaterials-technology-moves-from-lab-bench-to-orthopedic-market/#respond Wed, 22 Sep 2021 21:10:19 +0000 https://imphos.org/northwestern-invented-biomaterials-technology-moves-from-lab-bench-to-orthopedic-market/ Northwestern biomedical engineer Guillermo A. Ameer has achieved a rare and major achievement. An application based on a new material invented in his laboratory will be widely available for use in musculoskeletal reconstructive surgeries for the direct benefit of patients. The biomaterial technology, called CITREGEN ™, developed by start-up Acuitive Technologies, Inc., is featured in […]]]>

Northwestern biomedical engineer Guillermo A. Ameer has achieved a rare and major achievement. An application based on a new material invented in his laboratory will be widely available for use in musculoskeletal reconstructive surgeries for the direct benefit of patients.

The biomaterial technology, called CITREGEN ™, developed by start-up Acuitive Technologies, Inc., is featured in Stryker Corporation’s CITRELOCK ™, an innovative device that will debut this week at the American Orthopedic Foot Annual Meeting and Ankle Society in Charlotte, NC The CITRELOCK ™ Tendon Fixation Device System is used to attach soft tissue grafts to bone in reconstructive surgeries and offers surgeons a differentiated design using Ameer’s biomaterial.

CITREGEN ™ has unique chemical and mechanical properties for orthopedic surgical applications which aid in the healing of transplanted tissues. The polymer contains organic molecules and includes citrate, phosphate and calcium, materials essential for healthy bone growth. CITREGEN ™ is the first thermoset biodegradable synthetic polymer ever used in implantable medical devices.

CITREGEN ™ is Northwestern Technology’s third medical technology company that Stryker has released. A robotic arm invented by Michael Peshkin in 1997 hit the orthopedic markets after Stryker bought his medical device company, Mako, in 2013. And the cement mixer from former Northwestern Dental School teacher Richard Wixson was also purchased and developed by Stryker.

The ceramic implantable device, CITRELOCK ™, received approval from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) last year. The CITRELOCK ™ device has compressive strength comparable to cortical bone and maintains structural integrity during the healing phase, while allowing the implant to be reshaped by host tissue over time.

Founding director of Northwestern’s Center for Advanced Regenerative Engineering (CARE) and director of a newly created regenerative engineering training program funded by the National Institutes of Health, Ameer’s mission is to utilize engineering and training of the hand -Works to enable the practice of regenerative medicine to improve surgical outcomes and benefit patients. But generally, medical technologies derived from academic research take years to be adopted by a company, and more than a decade to receive clearance or approval from regulatory agencies such as the FDA.

Activated by collaboration

Guillermo Ameer

Ameer, Daniel Hale Williams Professor of Biomedical Engineering at the McCormick School of Engineering at Northwestern and Professor of Surgery at the Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern, looks back on the nearly 20 years he and his teams have spent developing the innovative technology of biomaterials.

“When I started my lab years ago here at Northwestern, one of my main goals was to use engineering to positively impact patient care. This objective has been the common thread of my research. I have sought to work with surgeons to fully understand medical issues, patient needs, constraints and find solutions, ”Ameer said.

“We first developed our citrate-based polymers about 18 years ago and first looked for applications in vascular and orthopedic tissue engineering. For the latter, we have created composites that are a blend of polymer and ceramic, the foundation of CITREGEN. ™ The first publication of these composites for bone regeneration, in collaboration with orthopedic surgeon Dr Jason Koh, was in the journal Biomaterials in 2006. Our work was developed by other researchers around the world, perhaps most notably Jian Yang, my former postdoctoral fellow and the current Dorothy Foehr Huck and J. Lloyd Huck Chair in Regenerative Engineering at Pennsylvania State University .

“A decade later, thanks to collaborations with industry, we were able to initiate the translation process to use our polymer technology in innovative bioresorbable orthopedic devices. Even though 20 years seems like a long time to see our technology come to market, we are fortunate to take this important step in my academic career. “

On the search for new materials: “What has motivated the development of polymers and citrate-based composites is the need to work with elastic materials such as rubber, easy to adapt, capable of supporting cellular functions, but also to dissolve safely in the body while being replaced by normal tissue, as no such material existed at the time. Working with an excellent team of students and post-docs, we invented a material from the start that took into account a variety of requirements. These included the body’s breakdown mechanism, the ability to synthesize easily and with safe components, and modularity to control material properties for a variety of potential applications. Over the years, we and others have shown that the citrate-based polymer can be incorporated into devices that help regenerate blood vessels, skin, heart, cartilage, bones, bladder, and tissues. muscle.

On demand for better devices: “There is a demand from surgeons and patients for better bioabsorbable devices, those that promote tissue regeneration or at least do not interfere with it. It is not easy to introduce new devices constructed with new bioresorbable polymers to the market due to issues with implants made from traditional biodegradable polymers and the scrutiny of regulatory agencies when reviewing. new bioabsorbable devices. It was a long process, but it was worth it to bring new solutions to market through established medical device companies. “

On Risk Taking: “Although we have been pioneering and working on this biomaterials technology for almost 20 years, great credit goes to visionaries in the industry, especially Acuitive Technologies and Stryker, for recognizing the potential of our technology and invested resources for its development and validation. It took Acuitive six years to develop CITREGEN ™ into useful products. The collaborations and partnerships that CARE has formed are important, replicating the success of CITREGEN ™ in other healthcare applications and translating other types of regenerative engineering technologies into clinical practice in the future.

Ameer’s work was recently recognized with the 2021 Clemson Prize for his contributions to literature and numerous other honors, including his election to the Fellowship of the Biomedical Engineering Society, American Institute of Chemical Engineers, Materials Research Society, American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering. , American Association for the Advancement of Science and National Academy of Inventors.

Ameer is also a member of the Simpson Querrey Institute, the Chemistry of Life Processes Institute, and the International Institute for Nanotechnology.

/ Public distribution. This material is from the original organization / authors and may be ad hoc in nature, edited for clarity, style and length. The views and opinions expressed are those of the author (s). See it in full here.

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Spinal Muscular Atrophy Treatment Market Expected to Grow by 2030 | Major companies include – Novartis, Cytokinetics, Astellas, Biogen, Novartis, Roche, PTC Therapeutics and others https://imphos.org/spinal-muscular-atrophy-treatment-market-expected-to-grow-by-2030-major-companies-include-novartis-cytokinetics-astellas-biogen-novartis-roche-ptc-therapeutics-and-others/ https://imphos.org/spinal-muscular-atrophy-treatment-market-expected-to-grow-by-2030-major-companies-include-novartis-cytokinetics-astellas-biogen-novartis-roche-ptc-therapeutics-and-others/#respond Tue, 21 Sep 2021 03:10:45 +0000 https://imphos.org/spinal-muscular-atrophy-treatment-market-expected-to-grow-by-2030-major-companies-include-novartis-cytokinetics-astellas-biogen-novartis-roche-ptc-therapeutics-and-others/ “Delveinsight LLP Commercial Research” The “Spinal Muscular Atrophy Market Insights, Epidemiology and Market Forecast 2030” report from DelveInsight provides an in-depth understanding of the historical and predicted epidemiology as well as the United States Spinal Muscular Atrophy market size and share. United States, EU5 (Germany, Spain, Italy, France and United Kingdom) and Japan. The Spinal […]]]>

“Delveinsight LLP Commercial Research”

The “Spinal Muscular Atrophy Market Insights, Epidemiology and Market Forecast 2030” report from DelveInsight provides an in-depth understanding of the historical and predicted epidemiology as well as the United States Spinal Muscular Atrophy market size and share. United States, EU5 (Germany, Spain, Italy, France and United Kingdom) and Japan.

The Spinal Muscular Atrophy Market Report covers emerging drugs, current treatment practices, individual therapy market share, current and forecast market size from 2017 to 2030. It assesses current treatment practice / algorithm, market drivers, barriers market and unmet medical needs to organize the best of opportunities and assess the underlying potential of the market.

Spinal muscular atrophy market

Spinal atrophy: an overview

According to the National Institute of Health (NIH), spinal muscular atrophy is a genetic disease characterized by weakness and atrophy (atrophy) of the muscles used for movement (skeletal muscles). It is caused by the loss of specialized nerve cells, called motor neurons, which control muscle movement. Weakness tends to be more severe in muscles that are close to the center of the body (proximal) compared to muscles that are far from the center of the body (distal). Muscle weakness usually gets worse with age.

ADS is a motor neuron disease caused by a biallelic mutation in the motor neuron survival gene 1 (SMN1). There are two identical genes SMN1 (telomeric copy) and SMN2 (centromeric copy) present on human chromosome 5q13. These genes are responsible for synthesizing the motor neuron survival protein that is necessary for the normal functioning of the motor neurons that control our muscles. Insufficient production of SMN proteins results in debilitating and often fatal muscle weakness.

Highlights of the Spinal Muscular Atrophy Market

  • Total spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) prevalent population in the seven main markets was 19,343 in 2017.

  • Among the EU5 countries, Germany was estimated to have the most prevalent population of spinal muscular atrophy with 1,643 cases in 2017, followed by the United Kingdom and France. In contrast, Spain had the lowest prevalence with 468 cases in 2017.

  • According to DelveInsight’s analysis, the diagnosis frequent cases of spinal muscular atrophy in the United States were 11,733 in 2017.

  • According to the study by B. Melissa et al. (2017), spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is the most common genetic disease leading to death in infancy, affecting approximately 1 in 6,000 to 1 in 10 births. 000. Therapies that improve neuromuscular function and maintain the lifelong general health of people with ADS are therefore a major priority and an unmet clinical need.

Spinal muscular atrophy market

Approaches to the management of spinal muscular atrophy focus on nutrition, assessment of respiratory care, respiratory muscle weakness, orthopedic care, rehabilitation, as well as some medication. The vast research and development activities of pharmaceutical companies, along with the increasing prevalence are expected to fuel the growth of the market in the coming years.

The market outlook section of the report helps to understand in detail the historical, current and forecast Spinal Muscular Atrophy Market Size and Share by analyzing the impact of current therapies on the market, unmet needs, drivers and barriers, and the demand for better technology.

The report details the Spinal muscular atrophy market trend of each drug marketed and therapy in the terminal phase by evaluating their impact according to the annual cost of the treatment, the inclusion and exclusion criteria, the mechanism of action, the increase in the number of patients, the patient segment coverage, planned launch year, competition with other therapies, brand value, their impact on the market and the views of key opinion leaders.

Request for sample @ Assessment of the spinal muscular atrophy therapeutic market

Epidemiology of spinal muscular atrophy

Epidemiology section covers overviews of history and current affairs Spinal muscular atrophy patient pool and predicted trends for seven major countries from 2017 to 2030. It helps recognize the causes of current and projected trends by exploring numerous studies and perspectives from key opinion leaders. The epidemiology section also provides the pool of patients diagnosed and their trends as well as the hypotheses adopted.

Spinal muscular atrophy drug uptake and pipeline development activities

The section on drug absorption focuses on the rate of absorption of potential drugs recently launched in the Spinal muscular atrophy market or is expected to be marketed during the study period. The analysis covers Drugs Spinal Muscular Atrophy Market Uptake; absorption of patients by therapies; and the sales of each drug.

The drug absorption section of the report helps to understand the drugs with the fastest absorption, the reasons for the maximum use of new drugs, and helps to compare drugs on the basis of market share and size. size, which will again be useful for studying the important factors in market absorption. and in financial and regulatory decision making.

The report also covers Spinal muscular atrophy pipeline development activities and provides valuable information on various phase II and phase III therapeutic candidates and on key market companies involved in the development of targeted therapies. It also analyzes recent developments such as collaborations, acquisitions and mergers, license patent details and other information on emerging therapies.

The Spinal Muscular Atrophy pipeline has several potential drugs in advanced and intermediate development that are expected to be launched in the near future.

Some of the key companies that are developing therapies for the treatment of spinal muscular atrophy include:

And many more.

Spinal muscular atrophy therapies covered in the report include:

And a few others.

Request a copy at: https://www.delveinsight.com/sample-request/spinal-muscular-atrophy-sma-pipeline-insight

Contents

1. Key information

2. Executive summary

3. Competitive intelligence analysis of spinal muscular atrophy

4.Spinal Muscular Atrophy Market Overview at a Glance

5. Background and overview of spinal muscular atrophy disease

6. Pathways of patients with spinal muscular atrophy

7. Spinal muscular atrophy epidemiology and patient population

8. Spinal muscular atrophy treatment algorithm, current treatment and medical practices

9. Spinal muscular atrophy Unmet needs

10. Main endpoints for treatment of spinal muscular atrophy

11. Products marketed for spinal muscular atrophy

12. Emerging therapies for spinal muscular atrophy

13. Major Market Analysis of Seven Spinal Muscular Atrophy

14. Attribute analysis

15. Spinal Muscular Atrophy Market Outlook (7 major markets)

16. Overview of access and reimbursement for spinal muscular atrophy

17. KOL’s Opinions on the Spinal Muscular Atrophy Market.

18. Spinal Muscular Atrophy Market Drivers

19. Barriers to the Spinal Muscular Atrophy Market

20. Annex

21. Capabilities of DelveInsight

22. Disclaimer

* The table of contents is not exhaustive; final content may vary.

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Report, Auto News, ET Auto https://imphos.org/report-auto-news-et-auto/ https://imphos.org/report-auto-news-et-auto/#respond Sun, 19 Sep 2021 08:29:00 +0000 https://imphos.org/report-auto-news-et-auto/ India ended the last fiscal year with copper imports of 2,333,671 tonnes. India’s copper import, which rose 26% to 60,766 tonnes in the June 2021-2022 quarter, is expected to increase further over the remainder of the year as economic activity continues to boom. COVID-related restrictions resumed, the International Copper Association said. The country’s copper imports […]]]>
India ended the last fiscal year with copper imports of 2,333,671 tonnes.

India’s copper import, which rose 26% to 60,766 tonnes in the June 2021-2022 quarter, is expected to increase further over the remainder of the year as economic activity continues to boom. COVID-related restrictions resumed, the International Copper Association said.

The country’s copper imports could reach 3 lakh ton as economic growth accelerates despite adequate domestic capacity to meet growing demand, he said.

“In the first quarter of fiscal 22, India’s copper imports increased by 26 cents to 60,766 tonnes, from 48,105 tonnes in the same period last year, even as the country was in the throes of a second wave of COVID with several lockdowns.

“Demand for the crucial metal, which is a key input for several sectors, is expected to increase further over the remainder of the year as economic activity sees a sharp recovery in COVID-related restrictions,” he said. he declares.

India ended the last fiscal year with copper imports of 2,333,671 tonnes.

With a growth of 26 to 30%, imports are expected to be in the order of 295,000 to 304,000 tonnes for the current fiscal year, the association added.

“It is disheartening to see imports increasing so sharply and other countries winning at our expense even though we have sufficient domestic production capacity to meet our domestic demand,” said Mayur Karmakar, director of the International Copper Association. .

“We are seeing a sharp increase in copper imports into the country. Even though the first quarter of this fiscal year saw several lockdowns and various restrictions imposed in several states due to the second wave of COVID, copper imports increased by 26%. compared to the same quarter last year, ”Karmakar said.

He said given strong demand from various sectors, copper imports could increase 30% year-on-year between July and March.

“With the economy opening up and foreclosure restrictions easing in most parts of the country, we are seeing a further surge in demand as manufacturing and other sectors gain momentum,” he added.

Significantly, India was a net exporter of copper for almost two decades before the closure of the Sterlite copper plant in Tuticorin, Tamil Nadu in May 2018.

In the same year, India became a net importer of copper for the first time. With increasing demand from various sectors, the import figure is expected to increase every year, although domestic production is hardly increasing.

According to the Ministry of Commerce, India generated net foreign exchange of US $ 1.1 billion from copper exports in 2017-18. However, after the closure of the Sterlite Copper smelter, India now experiences a net foreign exchange outflow of USD 1.2 billion due to copper imports each year.

In addition, India’s import of refined copper has benefited China to a large extent. Prior to the closure of the Tuticorin smelter, India exported copper worth US $ 2.1 billion to China in 2017. The same amount has sharply declined to just US $ 532 million in 2020. At the same time, copper exports to China from Pakistan and Malaysia increased by more than $ 2 billion from 2017 to 2020.

In other words, the suspension of operations at the Tuticorin smelter helped China reduce its import dependence on India by $ 1.5 billion.

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This week’s picks – COOL HUNTING® https://imphos.org/this-weeks-picks-cool-hunting/ https://imphos.org/this-weeks-picks-cool-hunting/#respond Sat, 18 Sep 2021 13:04:15 +0000 https://imphos.org/this-weeks-picks-cool-hunting/ Scientists map coral reefs globally for the first time Under the leadership of Arizona State University’s Center for Global Discovery and Conservation, more than 450 teams of scientists succeeded in creating the world’s first continuously updated map of the world’s shallow coral reefs, an endeavor that required 2.25 million satellite images covering approximately 100,000 square […]]]>

Scientists map coral reefs globally for the first time

Under the leadership of Arizona State University’s Center for Global Discovery and Conservation, more than 450 teams of scientists succeeded in creating the world’s first continuously updated map of the world’s shallow coral reefs, an endeavor that required 2.25 million satellite images covering approximately 100,000 square miles. As one of the most biodiverse ecosystems on the planet, coral reefs are an important home for marine life, but they remain endangered. The Allen Coral Atlas, already in use by 14 countries, will help track the effects of climate change on habitat and inform future ocean projects to save reefs. Learn more about this historic achievement at Hyperallergic.

Image by Greg Asner, courtesy of Allen Coral Atlas

New pop-up exhibition explores Harlem’s legacy as a fashion hub

55 years ago, fashion pioneer Lois K Alexander Lane founded the Harlem Institute of Fashion and later the Black Fashion Museum, to show the world how the black community was and plays a defining role in American style. Today, the last exhibition of Souleo and Beau McCall at the Schomburg Center, Exhibit: fashion in Harlem, pays homage to these institutions (closed in the 2000s), to the legacy of Alexander Lane and to pioneering black creators. The show, which runs September 9-16, features archival footage from Alexander Lane-led Harlem Fashion Week from the ’80s to’ 90s, as well as clothes and photos from the runway shows. Together, the exhibition pays homage to the thriving fashion community that Alexander Lane helped cultivate. Learn more about the exhibition at Refinery 29.

Image courtesy of Souleo Enterprises

Idle Taxis converted into vegetable gardens in Bangkok

Bangkok’s Ratchapruk and Bovorn Taxi cooperatives joined forces and turned the roofs of their currently unused taxis (immobilized due to lack of demand during the pandemic) into vegetable gardens. With “black plastic garbage bags stretched over bamboo frames” as a garden bed, the plots grow everything from green beans to cucumbers and tomatoes. But this installation is also a statement, as the co-ops currently only have 500 cars circulating in the city, of which 2,500 are idle, a huge blow to their business and their employees. As Thapakorn Assawalertkul says: “The vegetable garden is both an act of protest and a way to feed my staff during this difficult time. Thailand went through political turmoil for many years and a great flood in 2011, but business has never been so bad. Read more in The Associated Press.

Image courtesy of AP Photo / Sakchai Lalit

NASA’s new rock samples could prove the existence of life on Mars

Rock samples taken from the Jezero crater on Mars could indicate that life previously existed on the planet, according to NASA scientists. The samples, taken by the Perseverance rover (which first drilled on Mars on September 6, then again a few days later) were identified as being of volcanic origin. To scientists’ surprise, these samples also contained salts, presumably calcium sulfate or calcium phosphate, indicating tampering with the water and thus increasing the likelihood that life once existed on Mars. To learn more about these minerals, check out the BBC.

Image courtesy of NASA / JPL-Caltech

The Alexandre family farm is a pioneer of regenerative agriculture

This year, the Alexander Family Farm of California was the first dairy in the United States to become regenerative certified. It took more than three decades for fourth generation dairy farmers, Stephanie and Blake Alexandre, to perfect their sustainable farming practices, but their hard work has paid off. With their compost – made on the farm from cow manure and other local wastes – and a pioneering rotational grazing practice, their system restores wetlands, bringing in an abundance of wildlife, including wild geese. Aleutians, once threatened. As a dairy that manages thousands of cows and acres, the Alexandre Family Farm proves that regenerative agriculture is possible on a large scale, and without corporate help. Find out how the Alexander’s are leading a sustainable movement in the agriculture industry and what that means for the future at Civil Eats.

Image courtesy of Alexandre Family Farm

Didformat Studio Valley Residential Bridge Concept

Imagined by architect Amirhossein Nourbakhsh, founder of Didformat Studio, the concept of the residential valley bridge goes up along the abyss of a cliff in British Columbia. Three segments make up the structure of Nourbakhsh, which aims to damage the surrounding nature as little as possible: an upper level that crosses the ravine, a secondary level that offers a panoramic view of the waters below, and a final residential structure built of levels that work with the curves of the rocks. Below, Nourbakhsh includes a space for the passage of boats. See more concept images on designboom.

Image courtesy of Amirhossein Nourbakhsh

Discovery in Moroccan cave suggests humans made clothes 120,000 years ago

In the Smugglers Cave in Morocco, Dr Emily Hallett and her colleagues discovered animal artifacts that indicate that the first humans in Africa made clothes 120,000 years ago. The 62 bones and tools from the excavation (including sand fox and wildcat bones, as well as spatula-shaped instruments and other specialized devices) lead scientists to believe that the cave’s homo sapiens made clothes out of fur, smooth leather, and maybe even windbreakers. that go far beyond simple skin remains. Although the original appearance of these outfits remains unknown, these findings could prove that clothing is a hallmark of human behavior. Learn more about the discovery on The Guardian.

Image courtesy of Contrebandiers

Link About It is our filtered look on the web, shared daily in Link and on social media, and rounded up every Saturday morning. Image of the hero courtesy of AP Photo / Sakchai Lalit

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Hyperparathyroidism Secondary Treatment Market Report Covering Market Dynamics And How Businesses May Address Challenging Environment | Robust CAGR of 10.5% over the forecast period (2021-2027). https://imphos.org/hyperparathyroidism-secondary-treatment-market-report-covering-market-dynamics-and-how-businesses-may-address-challenging-environment-robust-cagr-of-10-5-over-the-forecast-period-2021-2027/ https://imphos.org/hyperparathyroidism-secondary-treatment-market-report-covering-market-dynamics-and-how-businesses-may-address-challenging-environment-robust-cagr-of-10-5-over-the-forecast-period-2021-2027/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 10:57:28 +0000 https://imphos.org/hyperparathyroidism-secondary-treatment-market-report-covering-market-dynamics-and-how-businesses-may-address-challenging-environment-robust-cagr-of-10-5-over-the-forecast-period-2021-2027/ Overview Secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) is a serious, frequent, and progressive consequence of chronic kidney disease (CRF) characterized by high levels of parathyroid hormone, mineral metabolic problems and an enlarged parathyroid gland. Since the failing kidneys are unable to convert vitamin A to its organic metabolite due to insufficient excretion of phosphate, the body produces insoluble […]]]>

Overview

Secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) is a serious, frequent, and progressive consequence of chronic kidney disease (CRF) characterized by high levels of parathyroid hormone, mineral metabolic problems and an enlarged parathyroid gland. Since the failing kidneys are unable to convert vitamin A to its organic metabolite due to insufficient excretion of phosphate, the body produces insoluble calcium phosphate, resulting in secondary hyperparathyroidism. Bone and joint pain, as well as limb abnormalities, are typical indications and symptoms of the disease. Patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism may have a poor quality of life and a shorter life expectancy due to the disturbances they experience. SHPT is treated with surgery or the use of prescription drugs that help keep parathyroid hormone, calcium, and phosphorus levels within acceptable target ranges. Diabetes and hypertension, according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, are the two main causes of chronic kidney disease. Patients with CRF, which can be caused by a variety of factors, can develop permanent kidney failure if left untreated.

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Conductors

One of the key drivers in the global secondary hyperparathyroidism treatment market is the increasing frequency of chronic kidney disease. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 30 million people, or 15% of all adults in the United States, have chronic kidney disease, 48% of whom have significantly reduced kidney function. However, many people ignore this condition. In addition, according to the National Kidney Foundation, chronic kidney disease affects 10% of the world’s population in 2016. In addition, considerable research in the field of nephrology to develop new drugs and therapies for the treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism fuel the global treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism. expanding the market. Sanofi SA’s Hectorol capsules are currently conducting phase 3 clinical studies to assess the safety and efficacy of the drug in reducing secondary hyperparathyroidism in juvenile patients with stage 3 and 4 chronic renal failure. December 2017, research on the drug will be completed and it will be commercially available.

Constraints

Muscle spasms, diarrhea, and nausea, which are usually associated with secondary treatment for hyperparathyroidism, should suffocate the patient. Secondary Hyperparathyroidism Treatment Market expansion.

Regional analysis

Due to the increased research and development of innovative therapies and potential drugs for secondary hyperparathyroidism, as well as a high incidence of chronic kidney disease, North America dominates the global secondary hyperparathyroidism treatment market. In 2014, 118,000 people in the United States began treatment for ESRD and 662,000 were on chronic dialysis, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Furthermore, Europe is expected to be the second largest contributor of revenue in the global secondary hyperparathyroidism treatment market, with considerable growth expected in the coming years. This is due to the introduction of new drugs and therapies to treat secondary hyperparathyroidism, as well as the existence of a large population affected by the disease in this area. The European Commission granted Amgen marketing authorization for etecalketide in December 2016 for the treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism in adults with chronic kidney disease.

Due to the fact that regional companies are undertaking clinical studies for the introduction of new drugs, Asia-Pacific is expected to be the fastest growing area. Kyowa Hakko Kirin China Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd. is conducting Phase 4 clinical research to evaluate the safety and efficacy of Cinacalet, its new lead chemical for the treatment of patients with mild to moderate PTSD. Cinacalet is expected to hit the market by April 2019.

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Reasons to buy this report

• Current and future of the world secondary treatment for hyperparathyroidism market outlook in developed and emerging markets
• The segment which is expected to dominate the market as well as the segment which holds the highest CAGR during the forecast period.
• Regions / countries expected to experience the fastest growth rates during the forecast period
• The latest developments, market shares and strategies used by the main market players

Competitive landscape

The major companies contributing to the global secondary hyperparathyroidism treatment market are Kyowa Hakko Kirin Co. Ltd., Amgen, Inc., F. Hoffmann-La Roche AG, OPKO Health, AbbVie, Inc., Leo Pharma, Shire, Inc., Deltanoid Pharmaceuticals, Astellas Pharma, Inc., Sanofi SA and KAI Pharmaceuticals.

To maintain their brand reputation and increase their market share, large companies focus on innovation and new product development. Rayaldee was launched by OPKO Health in June 2016 for the treatment of PTSD in people with stage 3 or 4 chronic kidney disease.

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Take action to solve the phosphorus problem https://imphos.org/take-action-to-solve-the-phosphorus-problem/ https://imphos.org/take-action-to-solve-the-phosphorus-problem/#respond Tue, 14 Sep 2021 17:24:00 +0000 https://imphos.org/take-action-to-solve-the-phosphorus-problem/ September 14, 2021 ASU experts discuss the effectiveness and sustainability of agricultural fertilizers Food production depends on phosphorus. It is an essential nutrient for crops of all kinds. And while commercial agriculture has grown over the past 70 years to feed a growing world population, phosphate rock mining has also grown to produce fertilizers. Unfortunately, […]]]>
September 14, 2021

ASU experts discuss the effectiveness and sustainability of agricultural fertilizers

Food production depends on phosphorus. It is an essential nutrient for crops of all kinds. And while commercial agriculture has grown over the past 70 years to feed a growing world population, phosphate rock mining has also grown to produce fertilizers.

Unfortunately, the application of these fertilizers is very inefficient. Only 20% of the phosphorus dumped in fields is taken up by plant roots and transported through the food chain. The rest is chemically locked away in the soil or dumped into canals, rivers, lakes and estuaries where agricultural irrigation eventually drains. This build-up in aquatic systems gradually causes eutrophication or the growth of harmful algal blooms that kill fish and other marine life.

“It’s a badIn planning and politics, a perverse problem is one that is difficult or impossible to solve due to incomplete, conflicting, and changing demands that are often difficult to recognize. Source: Wikipedia. problem, ”said Paul Westerhoff, Regents professor of civil, environmental and sustainable engineering at the Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering at Arizona State University. “At one level, it’s an environmental pollution problem. But it is also a question of the cost of the food. Simply reducing the use of phosphorus in fertilizers could decrease crop yields and increase the price of almost anything in the supermarket.

Westerhoff says reliance on mined phosphates is also a national security concern. Although the United States has significant reserves of phosphate rock in Florida and North Carolina, the current mining trajectory could deplete them within a generation. Most of the world’s rock phosphate reserves are found outside North America, and primarily in Morocco, making international relations a factor in long-term food production.

To address the complex ecological, economic and socio-political challenges associated with the rapidly expanding use of mined phosphorus in agriculture, the National Science Foundation has announced the establishment of a major new research center.

The Science and Technology Center for the Sustainability of Phosphorus (STEPS) brings together an interdisciplinary team of experts to pursue a “25 out of 25” vision. They seek to reduce human dependence on extracted phosphorus by 25% and also reduce current losses of phosphorus to soils and water resources by 25% over the next 25 years.

“Phosphorus is used in a very linear system right now. There is no recycling, ”said Jacob Jones, distinguished professor of materials science and engineering at North Carolina State University and director of the STEPS Center. “So our goal is to enable and encourage the recovery and reuse of phosphorus. We want to increase the circularity of phosphorus flows in the United States and around the world.

Funded by an initial grant of $ 25 million over five years and headquartered at North Carolina State University, the STEPS Center involves faculty, staff, and students from eight other partner institutions across the country, including ‘KNEW.

“Moving towards greater sustainability with this problem requires research on convergence,” said Westerhoff, who is deputy co-director of the STEPS Center as well as the Fulton chair of environmental engineering at the School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment. , one of seven Fulton schools at ASU.

This convergence means harnessing the knowledge and skills of researchers and practitioners in multiple disciplines operating at very different scales – from molecular chemistry to human psychology to industrial economics.

“At the level of basic science, for example, we know very little about the structure and nature of phosphorus in soils. We need to understand how it interacts with enzymes and how they might make it more bioavailable to plants, ”Westerhoff said. “It is estimated that 30 to 40% of all phosphorus that has ever been applied to agricultural fields is still found in the soil at the root zone of the crops we are growing. It is a significant untapped resource.

The evaluation of new materials, technologies, processes and practices developed by the STEPS Center will be done primarily in three field test areas. Work on rural ecosystems will take place at an agricultural research station in eastern North Carolina. Aquatic ecosystem research will take place at sites in central and southern Florida. Work on the urban ecosystem will be done through the ASU Central Arizona-Phoenix Long-Term Ecological Research Program, or CAP LTER.

Operating within the University’s Global Institute of Sustainability and Innovation, CAP LTER studies urban socio-ecological systems. The relevance of this work for STEPS highlights the fact that meeting the phosphorus challenge is not only a question of agricultural efficiency.

“In Phoenix, the monsoons scatter a lot of fertilizer from our parks and yards. Where is it going and how can we get it back? Said Westerhoff. “In addition, there is a lot of food waste in all major metropolitan areas. How could we start to reuse the phosphorus from this biomass? “

Urban sanitation systems also offer the potential for phosphorus recovery. Processing human urine to produce fertilizer for the alfalfa fields that feed dairy cows may seem extreme, but farmers have applied animal manure to the soil for millennia.

Changing the paradigm and embracing new perspectives will be necessary to improve the sustainability of phosphorus in our food system.

Along with Westerhoff, a diverse team of other ASU experts will play key roles for the new STEPS center:

  • Christopher Muhich, assistant professor of chemical engineering at Fulton Schools, will be part of the STEPS Theme 1 team, which is research into atomic and molecular scale materials for capturing phosphorus. Westerhoff will also support the work of this theme.
  • Treavor Boyer, Associate Professor of Environmental Engineering at Fulton Schools and Senior Sustainability Scientist for ASU’s Global Institute for Sustainability and Innovation, will co-lead the Theme 2-focused team at STEPS, which Applies Material Discovery from Theme 1 to advancing technologies and techniques in the laboratory, greenhouse and field. His team will seek to trap and reuse nutrients in animal and human urine to create the fertilizers of the future.
  • Bruce Rittmann, Professor of Environmental Engineering at Fulton Schools and Director of ASU’s Biodesign Swette Center for Environmental Biotechnology, is also working on Theme 2. He will explore technologies that scavenge phosphorus as well as energy and others. vital resources from municipal and industrial wastewater.
  • Rebecca Muenich, Assistant Professor of Civil, Environmental and Sustainable Engineering at Fulton Schools, will co-lead the Theme 3 team at STEPS, which focuses on socio-economic and political practices that will support the achievement of the dual purpose. reducing phosphate extraction and stopping losses to the environment. James Elser, professor-researcher at ASU’s School of Life Sciences and director of the university’s Sustainable Phosphorus Alliance, also supports the work of this theme, which has helped inspire STEPS.
  • Matthew Scholz, Senior Sustainability Scientist for ASU’s Global Institute of Sustainability and Innovation as well as Senior Project Manager for ASU’s Rob and Melani Walton Sustainability Solutions Service, will co-lead the knowledge transfer team at ASU. STEPS, which aims to promote rapid and wide adoption of the solutions developed by the center. Elser will also advise the work of this team.

“We believe this is the biggest investment ever in phosphorus sustainability,” said Scholz. “The entire global food system would collapse without phosphorus, but it pollutes our waters and causes climate change in major ways. “

In addition to North Carolina State University and ASU, STEPS partner institutions are Appalachian State University, University of Florida, University of Illinois, Marquette University, the Joint School of Nanoscience and Nanoengineering operated by North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University and the University of North Carolina Greensboro and the Research Triangle Institute, known as RTI International.

“We need everyone involved to help us develop an understanding of our best opportunities,” said Jones of North Carolina State University. “Maybe a particular material is only useful at a certain concentration, or a particular technique can only be used in certain soils or rivers. We need to figure out how to deploy our talents and tools to recover phosphorus as efficiently as possible and achieve this “25 out of 25” target.

Work on the new STEPS center officially begins on October 1.

Top image: Most of the phosphorus applied to crops as fertilizer is lost in the soil or as runoff to nearby canals, rivers, lakes and estuaries. This inefficiency poses environmental, economic and even national security challenges. Thus, ASU is working with a new national science and technology center focused on solving these problems and reducing agricultural dependence on phosphorus extracted from the earth. Photo by Erika Gronek / ASU

Science Editor, Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering

480-727-5622gary.werner@asu.edu

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UIC: the protein receptor in endothelial cells promotes healing in the lungs https://imphos.org/uic-the-protein-receptor-in-endothelial-cells-promotes-healing-in-the-lungs/ https://imphos.org/uic-the-protein-receptor-in-endothelial-cells-promotes-healing-in-the-lungs/#respond Tue, 31 Aug 2021 16:45:26 +0000 https://imphos.org/uic-the-protein-receptor-in-endothelial-cells-promotes-healing-in-the-lungs/ In the blood vessels of the lungs, endothelial cells form a protective barrier that regulates how fluids and other substances, such as white blood cells, are transported in and out of lung tissue by the bloodstream. However, in some cases, the endothelium becomes more permeable – it becomes “permeable,” which leads to increased inflammation and […]]]>

In the blood vessels of the lungs, endothelial cells form a protective barrier that regulates how fluids and other substances, such as white blood cells, are transported in and out of lung tissue by the bloodstream. However, in some cases, the endothelium becomes more permeable – it becomes “permeable,” which leads to increased inflammation and fluid build-up in the lungs, a condition known as pulmonary edema. These are classic signs of respiratory conditions like Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome, or ARDS, for which treatment options are limited both in number and in their ability to restore pulmonary vascular endothelial barrier function.

Now researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have identified a receptor expressed inside certain endothelial cells that, when activated, helps promote tissue regeneration and self-repair in models murine ARDS. Their findings are reported in Circulation Research, a journal of the American Heart Association.

“In our article, we described a population of endothelial cells in the lungs that express sphingosine phosphate 1 receptor 1 with the ability to repair endothelial integrity, which may prevent inflammatory pulmonary vascular injury,” Dolly said. Mehta, UIC Professor in the Department of Pharmacology and Regenerative Medicine at the College of Medicine and corresponding study author.

The sphingosine phosphate 1 receptor 1, or S1PR1, belongs to a family of receptors that associate with G proteins and play a role in the development and maintenance of blood vessels in several organs, including the lungs.

For the study, the researchers observed mice with lung leaks and mild inflammation.

First, they studied the generation of endothelial cells expressing the green fluorescent protein (GFP) -S1PR1 in mouse models. In these mice, any increase in GFP was indicative of S1PR1 activity. They also found that by activating certain cellular signals called transcription factors, they could increase the production of sphingosine 1 phosphate and help the cell generate more S1PR1 positive endothelial cells.

The researchers then studied the effects of the activated receptor in saving pulmonary vascular homeostasis. They injected endothelial cells expressing GFP-S1PR1 into mice with lung leaks and found that it reprogrammed endothelial cells by activating a self-healing signal. The mice that received the injection showed more signs of a healthy and selective endothelial barrier, such as reduced fluid accumulation.

“Our results show that culturing endothelial cells that express S1PR1 activates the endothelial regeneration program to mediate endothelial repair. These results raise the possibility of exploiting this pathway for potential drug treatments to restore vascular homeostasis in the states. of inflammatory vascular injury, ”Mehta said.

The co-authors of the study are Md-Zahid Akhter, Jagdish Joshi, Vijay Avin Balaji Ragunathrao, Mark Maienschein-Cline and Asrar Malik of UIC and Richard Proia of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.

This work was supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health (HL060678, HL137169, HL084153), the American Heart Association (19POST34450241), and the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (UL1TR002003).


This press release was produced by the University of Illinois at Chicago. The opinions expressed here are those of the author.

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The spleen-heart connection in heart repair explained https://imphos.org/the-spleen-heart-connection-in-heart-repair-explained/ https://imphos.org/the-spleen-heart-connection-in-heart-repair-explained/#respond Tue, 24 Aug 2021 03:18:00 +0000 https://imphos.org/the-spleen-heart-connection-in-heart-repair-explained/ Washington [US], Aug 24 (ANI): A preclinical study conducted by researchers at the University of South Florida (USF Health) analyzed the interactions of the lipid mediator sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) in the spleen and heart during the transition from acute phase to acute phase. Chronic heart failure. The study was published in the American Journal of Physiology-Heart […]]]>

Washington [US], Aug 24 (ANI): A preclinical study conducted by researchers at the University of South Florida (USF Health) analyzed the interactions of the lipid mediator sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) in the spleen and heart during the transition from acute phase to acute phase. Chronic heart failure.

The study was published in the American Journal of Physiology-Heart and Circulation.

Although we may survive without a spleen, evidence continues to mount that this abdominal organ plays a more valuable role in our physiological defenses than previously thought.

Using a mouse model of heart failure, researchers discovered new mechanisms to help define how the spleen and heart coordinate physiological inflammation in cardiac repair.

“The spleen contains a whole army of immune cells and signaling molecules that can be quickly mobilized to respond whenever a major injury like a heart attack or viral invasion occurs,” said Ganesh Halade, PhD, professor. associate of cardiovascular sciences at the University of Health of South Florida (USF Health) Morsani College of Medicine.

Dr Halade led a new preclinical study that analyzed the interactions of the lipid mediator sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) in the spleen and heart during the transition from acute heart failure to chronic heart failure. Researchers have discovered new heart repair mechanisms to help shed light on the spleen-heart coordination of physiological inflammation in a mouse model of heart failure.

“Simply put, we have shown that the spleen and heart work together via S1P for cardiac repair,” said lead researcher Dr. Halade, a member of the USF Health Heart Institute. “Our study also suggests that early detection of low or zero levels of S1P after a heart attack and targeted activation of this bioactive lipid mediator may provide cardioprotective therapy for patients at high risk for heart failure.” Dr. Halade and his colleagues have defined links between fatty acids, dysfunctional control of inflammation, and heart failure. His lab is focused on finding ways to prevent, delay, or treat unresolved inflammation after a heart attack. In this latest study, the researchers turned their attention to where S1P is produced and its role in cardiac repair.

S1P is a deregulated lipid mediator during inflammatory responses, including heart failure. In addition, several groups have demonstrated the potential importance of this signaling molecule as a therapeutic target for heart failure triggered by heart attack and ischemia-reperfusion injury.

The USF Health study captured the time-dependent movement of S1P from the spleen through blood plasma flowing to the heart. The work was the first to quantify the interactions between S1P and the S1P 1 receptor (S1PR1) during the progression of acute to chronic heart failure, said Dr Halade.

The researchers defined S1P / S1PR1 signaling in mice and humans with heart failure after a heart attack. The otherwise young and healthy “safe” mice did not exhibit any variable cardiovascular risk factors such as obesity, diabetes, hypertension, and aging commonly seen in clinical settings. The researchers correlated the physiological data from the experiments on the mouse model of cardiac repair with what they observed in pathologically failing human hearts.

Among their main findings: 1. Heart-specific S1P and S1PR1 levels were reduced in patients with ischemic heart failure.

2. In safe mice, physiological cardiac repair was facilitated by activation of S1P in the heart and spleen. S1P / S1PR1 signaling increased in both organs from acute heart failure to chronic heart failure, helping to promote heart repair after a heart attack.

3. An increase in plasma S1P indicates cardiac repair in the acute phase of heart failure.

4. Selective activation of the S1P receptor in macrophages (immune cells that help clear inflammation and guide tissue repair) suppressed inflammation biomarkers and accelerated cardiac healing biomarkers in cardiac cells. mouse.

“This study provides another example that the spleen should not be underestimated, as it contributes to the foundation of our immune health as well as the root cause of inflammatory diseases, including cardiovascular disease,” said Dr Halade. .

The research was funded by grants from the National Institutes of Health and the US Department of Veterans Affairs. The USF Health team worked with collaborators from the University of Alabama in Birmingham and the University of Hokkaido, Japan. (ANI)

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